Minding Her Ps and Qs (or Bs and Ds)

Keianna, like her sisters before her, is learning to differentiate between those tricky lower case letters.

The standard methods for teaching children to distinguish lower case “b” from “d” and “p” from “q” haven’t worked for my toddlers. While my children have been ready to begin learning to read at around two and a half or three, the gimics and explanations traditionally taught in preschools haven’t worked for their ages.

The word “bed” looking like a bed eludes them. So did the concept of “doughnuts” and “backs” or forming the letters with their hands. I have heard of some toddlers grasping these methods, but mine were bogged down by too much explanation, and needed something more concrete.

Mine did much better with just a little drill to recognize them by sight.

When Kaira was learning, I make a bunch of “b”s and “d”s on card stock then cut out, as well as a single capital D and a capital B.  We place the “Mommy Letters” (capitals) on the floor and give our little abcdarian the deck of lower case letters.. Her task is to put the “babies with the right mommy.” Basically a little matching game.  It worked beautifully for the two oldest and Keianna’s catching on after just a few minutes!

Here’s Keianna! She hasn’t quite made it to minding her “p”s and “q”s yet, but she’s working diligently on her “b”s and “d”s.

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6 thoughts on “Minding Her Ps and Qs (or Bs and Ds)

  1. Maybe this will work… I tell my children (over and over until they can repeat it to themselves):

    b… first the bat, then the ball…. and we pretend the stick is a baseball bat and the circle is a baseball.

    d… first the drum, then the drumstick!

    Worked for all five of mine. Maybe it will work for you?

  2. I had so much trouble learning to read with my b and d letters. But look at me now, I love to read and can’t find enough time to read all that I want. Don’t have any tricks for you, it just clicked one day and then I never had trouble with it again. So just put up with it for a little while and it will likely work itself out — at least it did for me. 🙂

  3. Dell,
    That is such a good idea. I may use it with my 6 year old. He still has trouble with b and d. I also like the idea in Christina’s comment. Great job ladies!
    Thanks, Love, & Blessings,
    (: Amanda 🙂

  4. This sounds familiar! I enjoyed seeing the pictures. It helped me to visual better.

    I made my “b” and “d” cards and we are still working on it, but Rachel has started sounding out words. I wanted her to be able to disinguish “b” and “d” before we attempted sounding out, but she gets so excited and charges ahead with the sounds. So I hate to put a damper on that!

    Thanks for your advice about the cards. Rachel is so different from my boys that this feels like new territory to me.

    Tina (Hearthkeepers)

  5. This sounds familiar! I enjoyed seeing the pictures. It helped me to visual better.

    I made my “b” and “d” cards and we are still working on it, but Rachel has started sounding out words. I wanted her to be able to disinguish “b” and “d” before we attempted sounding out, but she gets so excited and charges ahead with the sounds. So I hate to put a damper on that!

    Thanks for your advice about the cards. Rachel is so different from my boys that this feels like new territory to me.

    Tina (Hearthkeepers)

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